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Afognak Island State Park

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kodiak/afognakissp.htm

Identified in 1892 as one of the nation's first conservation areas, Afognak Island was originally designated as the Afognak Forest and Fish Culture Reserve because of its outstanding wildlife and salmon habitat value. In 1908 it was reclassified as part of the Chugach National Forest, then transferred in 1980 to native corporations through the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. In 1994, 41,549 acres were sold to the state for parklands to protect and restore habitat lost as a result of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (EVOS). In 2001 an additional 33,498 acres were purchased through EVOS funding for habitat protection, to include areas adjacent to the park lands. Afognak Island State Park now incorporates much of the east and north sides of the island, totaling over 75,000 acres. Most of this park is undeveloped and pristine except for an area south of Seal Bay that was partly logged in the early 1990s.

Alaska Veteran's Memorial

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/matsu/akveteransmemorial.htm

The memorial consists of five 20-foot tall concrete panels, one each to represent the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines and Coast Guard, arranged in a semi-circle. A statue of two Alaska Territorial Guards, carved by Canadian sculptor George Pratt, greet you at the entrance. On each panel is a short history of that branch's contribution to Alaska.

Anchor River State Recreation Area

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kenai/anchorpt.htm

The first written descriptions of the land and people of the Kenai Peninsula are found in the 1778 journals from the British sponsored expedition of Captain James Cook. According to legend, Anchor Point got its name when Captain Cook lost an anchor near the mouth of the river.

Archangle Road Trailhead

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/matsu/arcangeltrl.htm

Hatcher Pass Road Conditions: Please note that only the Palmer-Fishhook Road from the Palmer side to Independence Mine State Historical Park is paved. This road is open year-round except for the last mile to Independence Mine in winter months. Four-wheel-drive is recommended in winter months. The Hatcher Pass Road from Mile 17.5 to Mile 32.5 is a rough, gravel, narrow and steep road that is not maintained in the winter (closed) In the summer, the road is open but expect slow passage. Use of RV's or large vehicles in not recommended.

Arctic Valley Alpenglow

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/chugach/arcticvalleyalpenglow.htm

Arctic Valley Alpenglow is located within Chugach State Park, 10 miles north-east of downtown Anchorage.

Baranof Castle State Historic Site

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/southeast/baranofcastle.htm

Commonly referred to as Castle Hill, this park is one of the most historically significant sites in Alaska. Tlingit natives originally inhabited this area and built a strategic fortification at this site. Between 1804-1867 Russians occupied this site. In 1867, on top of Castle Hill, Alaska was officially transferred from Russia to the United States. Today, Castle Hill is a state historic site and also designated as a National Historic Landmark. A fully accessible walkway leads visitors to the top of the hill and provides outstanding views of downtown Sitka and waterfront. Interpretive panels provide opportunities to learn more about the history of this site. This park is located in downtown Sitka.

Big Delta State Historical Park

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/northern/bigdeltashp.htm

The Delta Historical Society maintains a museum in a sod-roofed cabin at Big Delta State Historical Park. The artifacts in the museum, dating from 1900 to 1950, were collected from local people. Artifacts include blacksmith tools, horse tack, dog harnesses and sleds, many household items and much more. There is also a display of historic photographs.

Big Eddy State Recreational Site

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kenai/bigeddysrs.htm

The Kenai River Special Management Area (SMA) consists of more than 105 linear miles of rivers and lakes, including Kenai Lake, Skilak Lake, and the Kenai River from river mile 82 downstream to four miles above the river's mouth on Cook Inlet. Adjacent to these waters are fifteen state park sub-units. Other Kenai River land is owned by cities, the borough and the federal government, as well as private and native lands. Please respect all property along the river.

Big Lake North State Recreation Site

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/matsu/biglakenosrs.htm

Big Lake North State Recreational Site is 13 miles west of Wasilla. Boating and fishing are extremely popular on the lake during the summer months. Big Lake is known as Alaska's Year-Round Playground resulting in large weekend and seasonal population increases as the area teems with people who have come to enjoy the many recreational opportunities. Big Lake summer activities include world class fishing, watersports, and wildlife viewing. Winter activities include snowmobiling, dog mushing, ice fishing and world-renowned cross country skiing!

Bing's Landing Campground & Day Use Area

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kenai/bingslandingcamp.htm

The Kenai River boasts major runs of four Pacific salmon species: king, red, silver and pink; in addition to trophy sized rainbow trout and Dolly Varden. Kenai River kings, or Chinook salmon, are among the largest North Pacific salmon, often weighing from 50 to over 85 pounds. The abundant productivity of the Kenai River and variety of habitats enables the area to support large concentrations of bald eagles and many species of migratory waterfowl. Moose, caribou, wolves, bears and other wildlife also use the river system's resources. The area offers prime opportunities for fishing, boating, camping and wildlife observation.

Birch Lake State Recreation Site

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/northern/birchlakesrs.htm

Birch Lake SRA is nestled between a lilypad covered lake and forested wetlands. Boat launch and courtesy dock with ADA Access. No long term docking, approximate 20 minute time limit. Users should bring their own firewood, especially in winter for use in the cabin, since there is not much left to scavenge in the surrounding forest.

Bird Creek Campground

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/chugach/birdcreekcamp.htm

The Bird Creek Campground and its immediate vicinity located south of the Seward Highway and to the north of the Indian to Girdwood National Recreation Pathway is closed by Directors Order to the public as of 20 May, 2011.

Bird Creek Campground Overflow

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/chugach/birdcreekoverflow.htm

Bird Creek campground overflow is located south of Anchorage at Bird Creek. The campground there also offers experiences ranging from fishing, hiking, whale watching, wildlife viewing, and spectacular sunsets.

Bishop Creek Day Use Area

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kenai/bishopcreek.htm

Bishop Creek Day Use Area is located in the Captain Coook SRA. The park is virtually undiscovered by most visitors to the Kenai Peninsula. It offers a peaceful setting of forests, lakes, streams and saltwater beaches.

Blueberry Lake State Recreation Site

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kenai/blueberrylksrs.htm

Blueberry Lake State Recreation Site is located in spectacular Thompson Pass, 24 miles north of Valdez. The park is located at the large switchback before descending into Keystone Canyon. The high alpine lake offer excellent grayling fishing.

Buskins River State Recreation Site

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kodiak/buskinriversrs.htm

Buskin River State Recreation Site borders the Buskin River and is near the state airport. The Buskin River is one of the most productive fisheries on the Kodiak road system. Visitors from around the world visit this river to fish for sockeye and coho salmon. For those that like to hike or mountain bike, there are old military roads connecting WWII structures hidden in the spruce forest on the north side of the park. Visitors can expect to see a variety of birds and wildlife including brown bears, eagles, harlequin ducks, and harbor seals. Most camping sites are suitable for R.Vs and there is an R. V. overflow area. Camping sites are available on a first come first serve basis. There are two picnic shelters and a handicapped-accessible fishing platform located nearby the river.

Byers Lake Campground

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/matsu/byerslkcamp.htm

This quiet, family campground is nestled on Byers Lake at the foot of Kesugi Ridge. The area offers spectacular views of Mt. McKinley. It is located 147 miles north of Anchorage and 90 miles from the National Park Service entrance. Burbot, Lake and RainbowTrout fishing. Byers Lake has three Public Use Cabins for nightly rental.

Caines Head State Recreation Area

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kenai/cainesheadsra.htm

Caines Head State Recreation Area is the scenic site of an abandoned World War II fort, can be reached by boat or foot from Seward. The massive headland rises 650 feet above Resurrection Bay, against a back drop of rolling alpine meadows and sharp peaks, giving way to a sweeping view of the North Pacific Ocean.

Captain Cook Special Management Area

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/kenai/captcook.htm

Captain Cook State Recreation Area is virtually undiscovered by most visitors to the Kenai Peninsula. It offers a peaceful setting of forests, lakes, streams and saltwater beaches. The recreation area can be reached by driving 25 miles north of Kenai on the North Kenai Road to milepost 36.

Chena River State Recreation Area

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/northern/chenariversra.htm

More than ever, Chena River State Recreation Area is a park for all seasons. Are you interested in a day of hiking and rock-climbing at Granite Tors? Or would you prefer to harness up the dog team and escape into the snowy horizon, or perhaps ride a 4-wheeler along a forest trail? With 397 square miles of forests, rivers, and alpine tundra, the recreation area has something to offer everyone. The variety of activities draws more than 150,000 people to the Chena River State Recreation Area every year.

Chena River State Recreation Site

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/northern/chenariversrs.htm

Chena River State Recreation Site (also known as Chena Wayside) is located in downtown Fairbanks on University Avenue. This 29-acre park sits on the banks of the Chena River. Facilities include over 60 campsites for vehicles, 11 have electric and water hookup, five walk-in campsites, picnic sites along the river, drinking water, restrooms with flush toilets, dump station, boat launch, and river side walking trails. For group use by reservation, there is a playfield with a shelter.

Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/southeast/chilkatbep.htm

The Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve was created by the State of Alaska in June of 1982. The preserve was established to protect and perpetuate one of the world's largest concentration of Bald Eagles and their critical habitat. It also sustains and protects the natural salmon runs and allows for traditional uses; provided such uses do not adversely affect preserve resources.

Chilkat State Park

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/southeast/chilkatsp.htm

This park offers a log cabin contact/information center, 35-site campground, picnic area, boat launch and trails. The campground sits in a mixed forest of evergreens and deciduous trees at the edge of Chilkat Inlet. The boat launch provides access to the inlet and the run of king salmon in early June. The contact/information centers offers incredible views of Chilkat Inlet, Rainbow and Davidson glaciers. The center also has wildlife spotting scopes so you can spot the inlet wildlife, such as seals, porpoises, and whales. Visitors have even been able to spy on bears and mountain goats on the other side of the inlet.

Chilkoot Lake State Recreation Site

http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/aspunits/southeast/chilkootlksrs.htm

Chilkoot Lake State Recreation Site is at the south end of Chilkoot Lake, near the outlet to the Chilkoot River. The campground sits amid a beautiful stand of Sitka spruce.
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