Arizona

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Alamo Lake State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/ALLA/index.html

Alamo Lake State Park is one of Arizona's best kept secrets. The stark desert beauty is reflected off the water. Cacti dot the mountainous landscape that surround the lake. Nestled in the Bill Williams River Valley away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, Alamo Lake State Park offers outdoor fun, premier bass fishing, rest and relaxation. For nature lovers, spring rains bring an abundance of wild flowers and the lake environment attracts a variety of wildlife year round, including bald and golden eagles, waterfowl, foxes, coyotes, mule deer and wild burros. Stargazers are sure to enjoy the unbelievable view of the night sky with the nearest city lights some forty miles away!

Buckskin Mountain State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/BOTH/index.html

Buckskin Mountain State Park commands one of the finest views along the Parker strip, an 18-mile stretch between Parker Dam and Headgate Dam. Mountains line the river on both the Arizona and California sides, and the wildlife is as varied as the recreational opportunities along the river. This picturesque park provides a scenic respite, mountain hikes, a desert escape and fun-filled water adventure.

Catalina State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/CATA/index.html

Catalina State Park sits at the base of the majestic Santa Catalina Mountains. The park is a haven for desert plants and wildlife and nearly 5,000 saguaros. The 5,500 acres of foothills, canyons and streams invites camping, picnicking and bird watching — more than 150 species of birds call the park home. The park provides miles of equestrian, birding, hiking, and biking trails which wind through the park and into the Coronado National Forest at elevations near 3,000 feet. The park is located within minutes of the Tucson metropolitan area.

Cattail Cove State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/CACO/index.html

The beach, boat ramp, and 61 campsites at Cattail Cove State Park offer a broad spectrum of activities for all to enjoy. Whether you're interested in swimming, fishing or just lounging and relaxing, Cattail Cove State Park offers you and your family a chance to get away and enjoy tranquility along Lake Havasu. The 2,000-acre park has been operated by the Arizona State Parks Board since 1970.

Dead Horse Ranch State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/DEHO/index.html

The developed portion of Dead Horse Ranch State Park covers 423 acres. The 3,300 foot elevation accounts for the mild temperatures that are ideal for camping, mountain biking in the Coconino National Forest, hiking along the Verde River, canoeing, picnicking, fishing, or just wading in the cool water.

Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/FOHO/index.html

Imagine camping among 100-foot pine trees beside a quiet lake watching majestic great blue herons at a cool 6,300 feet in elevation. Year-round camping, fishing, picnicking, boating and wildlife viewing opportunities make Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area a popular place. This 800-acre, cool, country recreation area with a 150-acre lake offers history, too.

Fort Verde State Historic Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/FOVE/index.html

Experience life through the eyes of a frontier soldier at Fort Verde State Historic Park. The fort was a base for General Crook’s U.S. Army scouts and soldiers in the 1870s and 1880s. From 1865 – 1891 Camp Lincoln, Camp Verde and Fort Verde were home to officers, doctors, families, enlisted men, and scouts. The park is the best-preserved example of an Indian Wars period fort in Arizona. Several of the original buildings still stand and living history programs are scheduled periodically, giving visitors a glimpse into Arizona’s history.

Homolovi State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/HORU/index.html

In the high grassland of 14th century northern Arizona, an ancient people found a home along the Little Colorado River. These people, the Hisat'sinom (known to archaeologists as the Anasazi), paused in their migrations to till the rich flood plain and sandy slopes before continuing north to join people already living on the mesas, people who are today known as the Hopi.

Jerome State Historic Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/JERO/index.html

Jerome's modern history began in 1876 when three prospectors staked claims on rich copper deposits. They sold out to a group which formed the United Verde Copper Company in 1883. The resultant mining camp of board and canvas shacks was named in honor of Eugene Jerome, the venture's principal backer. Hopes for the enterprise ran high, but the costs of operating, especially for transportation, outstripped profits, and the company folded in less than two years.

Kartchner Caverns State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/KACA/index.html

Experience a stunning limestone cave in Southeastern Arizona that boasts world-class features. This “live” cave, discovered in 1974, is host to a wide variety of unique minerals and formations. Water percolates from the surface and calcite formations continue to grow, including stalactites dripping down like icicles and giant stalagmites reaching up from the ground. Tour guides will unveil this fascinating underground landscape during a memorable 1½ hour tour.

Lake Havasu State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/LAHA/index.html

The scenic shoreline of Lake Havasu State Park is an ideal place to enjoy beautiful beaches, nature trails, boat ramps, and convenient campsites. This spot is truly a watersport haven located near the famous London Bridge of Lake Havasu City.

Lost Dutchman State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/LODU/index.html

Named after the fabled lost gold mine, Lost Dutchman State Park is located in the Sonoran Desert, 40 miles east of Phoenix. Several trails lead from the park into the Superstition Wilderness and surrounding Tonto National Forest. Take a stroll along the Native Plant Trail or hike the challenging Siphon Draw Trail to the top of the Flatiron. Depending on the year’s rainfall, you might be treated to a carpet of desert wildflowers in the spring. Enjoy a weekend of camping and experience native wildlife including mule deer, coyote, javelina and jackrabbit.

Lyman Lake State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/LYLA/index.html

Created as an irrigation reservoir by damming the Little Colorado River, Lyman Lake State Park is a 1,200-acre park that encompasses the shoreline of a 1,500-acre reservoir at an elevation of 6,000 feet. It is fed by snowmelt from the slopes of Mount Baldy and Escudilla Mountain, the second and third highest mountains in Arizona. Water is channeled into this river valley from a 790-square-mile watershed extending into New Mexico. Note: There are no boat rentals at this park.

McFarland State Historic Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/MCFA/index.html

The history of the park's building provides visitors with a look into the past. The building represents a transition between Sonoran and Anglo-American architecture with its wood-shingled pitched roof surmounting traditional adobe brick walls. Like most buildings in Territorial Arizona, the original 1878 structure was constructed by hand using native materials. Soil from the area was used to make adobe bricks which were laid on a trench foundation filled with river rocks. All lumber for the floors and roof was hauled by wagon from northern Arizona.

Oracle State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/ORAC/index.html

Oracle State Park is a 4,000 acre wildlife refuge in the northern foothills of the Catalina Mountains. Once part of the Kannally family cattle ranch, the unique Mediterranean style ranch house in the park is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Patagonia Lake State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/PALA/index.html

Tucked away in the rolling hills of southeastern Arizona is a hidden treasure. Patagonia Lake State Park was established in 1975 as a state park and is an ideal place to find whitetail deer roaming the hills and great blue herons walking the shoreline. The campground overlooks a 265-acre man-made lake where anglers catch crappie, bass, bluegill, and catfish. Trout is stocked every three weeks from October through March. The tracks of the New Mexico/Arizona railroad lie beneath the lake and remnants of the old historic line may be found at the Nature Conservancy in Patagonia. Hikers can stroll along the beautiful creek trail and see a variety of birds such as the canyon towhee, Inca dove, vermilion flycatcher, black vulture, and several species of hummingbirds.

Picacho Peak State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/PIPE/index.html

Visitors traveling along I-10 in southern Arizona can’t miss the prominent 1,500-foot peak of Picacho Peak State Park. Enjoy the view as you hike the trails that wind up the peak and, often in the spring, overlook a sea of wildflowers. The park and surrounding area are known for its unique geological significance, outstanding and varied desert growth, and historical importance. The unique shape has been used as a landmark by travelers since prehistoric times. One of the first recordings was in the 1700s by the Anza Expedition as it passed through the area.

Red Rock State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/RERO/index.html

Red Rock State Park is a 286 acre nature preserve and environmental education center with stunning scenery. Trails throughout the park wind through manzanita and juniper to reach the rich banks of Oak Creek. Green meadows are framed by native vegetation and hills of red rock. The creek meanders through the park, creating a diverse riparian habitat abounding with plants and wildlife. This riparian habitat provides the setting and the opportunity for the park to offer a focus on environmental education.

Riordan Mansion State Historic Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/RIMA/index.html

Built in 1904 for two Riordan families, Riordan Mansion is an impressive reminder of gracious living in a small, territorial logging town. The historic building is an Arizona treasure — a remarkable example of Arts and Crafts style architecture featuring a rustic exterior of log-slab siding, volcanic stone arches, and hand-split wooden shingles. The expansive home has forty rooms, over 13,000 square-feet of living area, and servant's quarters. The Riordan residence was designed by the creator of Grand Canyon's El Tovar Hotel, Charles Whittlesey.

River Island Unit

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/RIIS/index.html

River Island State Park is ideal for tent campers and can provide a scenic respite, a desert escape, or a fun-filled water adventure. It offers 37 campsites, a ramada, sandy beach, cove, and boat launch area.

Roper Lake State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/ROLA/index.html

After a long day of driving or hiking, the natural hot springs at Roper Lake State Park are inviting and invigorating. Enjoy desert vegetation, an accessible fishing dock, and stunning views of Mount Graham. Roper Lake is stocked with Largemouth bass and Rainbow trout; it’s a great place for kids to catch their first fish. Boats are limited to small electric motors, creating ideal conditions for a sail board or a canoe. Enjoy five miles of trails in the park and nearby Dankworth Pond. Take advantage of excellent birdwatching and glimpse Gamble’s quail and heron. The park’s camping cabins offer an easy, fun camping experience.

San Rafael State Natural Area

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/SARA/index.html

The San Rafael State Natural Area is a unique area with rolling hills, native grasses, and oak and cottonwood trees. This beautiful valley is the headwaters of the Santa Cruz River, which flows into Mexico then turns north back into the United States and eventually joins the Gila River. The riparian areas and native grass prairie are home to many species of plants and animals. One of the endangered plants, Huachuca Water Umbel grows in the river area. One can also see Mule Deer, Javalina, Antelope, Bobcats, Cougar, Coyote and many birds unique to the prairie.

Slide Rock State Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/SLRO/index.html

Slide Rock State Park, originally the Pendley Homestead, is a 43-acre historic apple farm located in Oak Creek Canyon. Frank L. Pendley, having arrived in the canyon in 1907, formally acquired the land under the Homestead Act in 1910. Due to his pioneering innovation, he succeeded where others failed by establishing a unique irrigation system still in use by the park today. This allowed Pendley to plant his first apple orchard in 1912, beginning the pattern of agricultural development that has dominated the site since that time. Pendley also grew garden produce and kept some livestock.

Sonoita Creek State Natural Area

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/SOCR/index.html

Established in 1994, Sonoita Creek State Natural Area's mission is to preserve this fragile riparian area and its surrounding environment. Encompassing a major portion of the Sonoita Creek and Coal Mine Spring watersheds, this is the State of Arizona's first significant Natural Area.

Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park

http://azstateparks.com/Parks/TOCO/index.html

Get a glimpse of the true old West at Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park. Built in 1882 in the shape of a Roman cross, the two-story Victorian structure once housed the offices of the sheriff, recorder, treasurer, board of supervisors, jail, and courtrooms of Cochise County. Today, the 12,000 square foot courthouse is a museum filled with the glitter and guns of those who tamed the territory.
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