Arkansas

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Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//museumofnaturalresources

In the 1920s, nationwide attention focused on south Arkansas when the Smackover field was ranked first among the nation's oil fields. For five months in 1925, the 40-square-mile Smackover field was the focal point of one of the wildest mineral booms in North America. Today, south Arkansas's oil fields produce petroleum throughout a 10-county area.

Arkansas Post Museum

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//arkansaspostmuseum

Explore this complex of five exhibit buildings and learn about life on, and the history of, Arkansas's Grand Prairie and Delta. The Main House contains an audiovisual room and gift shop. The Summer Kitchen showcases domestic tools and kitchen instruments of old. The Peterson Building interprets life on the southern end of the Grand Prairie and the Delta through exhibits and artifacts on display. Two buildings on the museum grounds are original to the Grand Prairie. The 1877 Refeld-Hinman Loghouse is an example of how houses were built on the prairie and throughout the Delta. The 1933 Carnes-Bonner Playhouse, a miniature built-to-scale version of the Carnes' family home, displays children's furnishings, accessories and toys.

Bull Shoals-White River State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//bullshoalswhiteriver

In north central Arkansas amidst the natural beauty of the Ozark Mountains, Bull Shoals-White River State Park stretches along the riverside and lakeshore where the White River and Bull Shoals Lake join at the Bull Shoals dam. Together these waters form one of the nationís finest fishing and boating combinations. The White River is renowned as mid-Americaís premier trout stream, famous for its record rainbow and brown trout. Bull Shoals Dam forms Bull Shoals Lake, Arkansasís largest lake with 45,440 acres of waters stretching along Arkansas's northern border and into southern Missouri. Anglers are drawn to the lake's catches of lunker bass, catfish, crappie, and bream. Water sports enthusiasts can enjoy boating and swimming in these clear open waters.

Cane Creek State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//canecreek

Located where the rolling terrain of the West Gulf Coastal Plain and the alluvial lands of east Arkansas's Mississippi Delta meet, this park offers you the opportunity to explore two of Arkansas's distinct natural settings in one visit. Hike or bike the park's 2,053 acres of woodlands in the Coastal Plain. Paddle or fish on 1,675-acre Cane Creek Lake, a timbered Delta lake, and experience the lush beauty and abundant wildlife that inhabit Arkansas's Mississippi Delta. Just across the timber-filled lake, anglers and paddlers can also explore Bayou Bartholomew, the world's longest bayou.

Conway Cemetery State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//conwaycemetery

James Sevier Conway (1796-1855), surveyor, planter, prominent and influencial citizen of pioneer Arkansas, took office as Arkansas's first governor when Arkansas was admitted to the Union as the 25th state on June 15, 1836. Dedicated to his memory, this 11.5-acre state historic site preserves Governor Conwayís final resting place, the one-half acre family plot at what was once his cotton plantation. The cemetery lies just south of the former site of the Conway plantation home called Walnut Hill.

Cossatot River State Park-Natural Area

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//cossatotriver

This park-natural area stretches for 12 miles along the wild and scenic Cossatot River, Arkansas's premier whitewater experience renowned as the best whitewater float stream in mid-America. Located in southwest Arkansas south of Mena, the Cossatot forms Cossatot Falls, a rugged and rocky canyon that challenges the most experienced canoeists and kayakers with its Class IV and V rapids. When the water is high, the paddlers are here. This National Wild and Scenic River is a watershed basin with flow levels dependent on rainfall. After significant precipitation, the river level rises, allowing experienced paddlers the opportunity to test their skills in challenging Class IV and V whitewater. At the river's Cossatot Falls area, a rocky canyon with distinct ledges, the river drops 33 feet in elevation within 1/3 of a mile. Late winter to early spring is peak whitewater paddling season here. Class III-V whitewater is for experts only. Floatable river levels are usually limited to late-fall, winter and spring. For river stage information (in feet) from the Highway 246 access, call (870) 387-3141 or visit the U.S. Geological Survey website for Cossatot River real time data at: waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07340300.

Crater of Diamonds State Park

http://www.craterofdiamondsstatepark.com

Arkansas The Natural State is blessed with an abundance of geological wonders. Crater of Diamonds State Park, the only diamond-producing site in the world open to the public, stands out as a unique geological "gem" for you to explore and enjoy.

Crowley's Ridge State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//crowleysridge

Located atop the forested hills in northeast Arkansas, Crowley's Ridge State Park occupies the former homestead of Benjamin Crowley, whose family first settled this area.

Daisy State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//daisy

In this scenic setting in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountain, Lake Greeson, the Little Missouri River, and Daisy State Park make a winning combination for outdoor enthusiasts. Lake Greeson, 7,000 acres of clear water and mountain scenery, delights water enthusiasts. Catches of black and white bass, stripers, crappie, catfish, and bluegill account for its popularity with anglers.

Davidsonville Historic State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//olddavidsonville

This park preserves the site of historic Davidsonville. Established in 1815, the town included the Arkansas Territory's first post office, courthouse and land office. Bypassed by the Southwest Trail, an overland route from St. Louis to the border of Mexico, the town faded by the 1830s. Archeological excavations here are uncovering remarkable finds of streets, foundations and objects that tell a fascinating story of life on the Arkansas frontier following the Louisiana Purchase. Park exhibits and interpretive tours provide information about this important frontier town.

DeGray Lake Resort State Park

http://www.degray.com

DeGray Lake Resort State Park is Arkansasís only resort state park. Set in the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains and nestled along the north shore of 13,800-acre DeGray Lake, one of the regionís five Diamond Lakes known for their crystal clear waters, DeGray offers all the outdoor adventure and quality of an Arkansas State Park combined with resort class amenities. DeGray is a fishing and water sports paradise, a golf resort, the ideal camping spot and the perfect location for family vacations, getaways, reunions, weddings, business meetings and retreats.

Delta Heritage Trail State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//deltaheritagetrail

This rails-to-trails conversion in southeast Arkansas is being developed in phases along the 73-mile former Union Pacific Railroad right-of-way that stretches from one mile south of Lexa (six miles west of Helena) to Cypress Bend (five miles northeast of McGehee), one of the former routes of The Delta Eagle.

Devil's Den State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//devilsden

On April 16, 2010, Devil's Den Cave and Ice Box Cave at Devil's Den State Park near West Fork closed temporarily to the public. Earlier, in May 2009, the park's Farmer's Cave and Big Ear Cave closed. These closures are necessary in an effort to protect these caves from the possibility of contamination from White-nose Syndrome, a fungus that has killed millions of hibernating bats in the New England and Mid-Atlantic states. The disease is transmitted bat to bat. White-nose Syndrome was first detected in February 2006 in Schoharie County, New York. It has now spread as far west as Tennessee, Kentucky, and Indiana. For more information about these cave closures, visit: www.arkansasstateparks.com/news/for-media/display.aspx?id=1442

Hampson Archeological Museum State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//hampsonmuseum

Hampson Archeological Museum State Park in northeast Arkansas exhibits a nationally renowned collection from the Nodena site, a 15-acre palisaded village that once thrived on a meander bend of the Mississippi River in what is today Mississippi County. Hampson Archeological Museum interprets the lifestyles of this farming-based civilization that lived there from 1400 to 1650 A.D. Artifacts and exhibits share the story of this early aboriginal population of farmers who cultivated crops and supplemented their food resources with hunting native game while developing its art, religion and political structure along with a thriving trading network.

Herman Davis State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//hermandavis

This one-acre park in Manila surrounds the gravesite of and monument to Private Herman Davis, Arkansas farm boy and war hero. Fourth on General John J. Pershingís list of World War Iís 100 greatest heroes, Private Davis received the Distinguished Service Cross, the Croix de Guere and the Medaulle Militaire awards from the American and French governments.

Historic Washington State Park

http://www.HistoricWashingtonStatePark.com

Historic Washington, Arkansas, is a lovely, peaceful tree-shaded town in and one of the most amazing historic places in Arkansas that you'll want to experience. Here you will time travel back to the 19th century as you stroll the plank board sidewalks alongside streets that have never been paved, and tour the historic public buildings and former residences. Established on George Washington's birthday in 1824, the town of Washington today is one of America's premier historic villages. Historic Washington State Park is a National Historical Landmark, a National Register of Historic Places site, and an Arkansas state park you'll want to visit.

Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//hobbsstateparkconservationarea

Arkansas's largest state park in land area, Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area (HSPCA) covers a 12,056-acre tract of diverse Ozark landscape along the southern shore of 28,370-acre Beaver Lake. Twenty-two of the parkís 60 miles of border stretch along the shores of Beaver Lake. The park lies between Beaver Lake to the north and War Eagle Creek to the south with acreage stretching across a part of Benton County southeast of Beaver Lake and extending into Madison and Carroll counties.

Jacksonport State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//jacksonport

In the 1800s steamboats made Jacksonport a thriving river port. During the Civil War, the town was occupied by both Confederate and Union forces because of its crucial locale. Jacksonport became county seat in 1854, and constuction of a stately, two-story brick courthouse began in 1869. The town began to decline in the 1880s when bypassed by the railroad. The county seat was moved in 1891 to nearby Newport, and Jacksonport's stores, wharves and saloons soon vanished.

Jenkins Ferry Battleground State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//jenkinsferry

In the spring of 1864, three Civil War battles took place in south central Arkansas that were part of the Union Army's "Red River Campaign." Arkansas's three state historic parks that commemorate these battles--Poison Springs Battleground State Park, Marks' Mills Battleground State Park and Jenkins Ferry Battleground State Park--are part of the Red River Campaign National Historic Landmark.

Lake Catherine State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//lakecatherine

Nestled in the natural beauty of the Ouachita Mountains on 1,940-acre Lake Catherine, one of the five popular Diamond Lakes in west central Arkansas, Lake Catherine State Park features CCC/Rustic Style facilities constructed of native stone and wood by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the 1930s.

Lake Charles State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//lakecharles

Anglers and nature lovers will enjoy this park on the shore of Lake Charles, 645 acres of spring-fed waters in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains. The lake offers good catches of bass, crappie, bream and catfish.

Lake Chicot State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//lakechicot

The Mississippi Delta's captivating beauty and recreational opportunities come together at Arkansas's largest natural lake, Lake Chicot. Cut off centuries ago when the Mississippi River changed course, this 20-mile long oxbow lake is a peaceful setting for fishing, boating, and bird watching. Fishing for crappie, bass, and bream is popular on the lake, especially on the upper end of Lake Chicot during spring and fall. Fishing for catfish is great throughout the year.

Lake Dardanelle State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//lakedardanelle

Surrounded by the natural beauty for which the Arkansas River Valley is known, Lake Dardanelle is a sprawling 34,300-acre reservoir on the Arkansas River. These two water resources combined here have put this area into the national spotlight as a major bass fishing tournament site. Lake Dardanelle State Park offers two areas on the lake: one park site is at Russellville, and the other is located at nearby Dardanelle. Both the Russellville (main park) and Dardanelle locations offer camping (74 sites: Russellville--16 Class AAA, 14 Class AA, and 26 Class B; Dardanelle Area--18 Class B), launch ramps, standard pavilions, picnic sites, restrooms, and bathhouses with hot showers.

Lake Fort Smith State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//lakefortsmith

Nestled in a scenic valley of the Boston Mountain Range of the Ozark Mountains, this state park offers outdoor adventures including camping, fishing, kayaking, swimming, mountain biking, hiking, and nature study. For backpackers, the park serves as the western terminus of the 165-mile Ozark Highlands National Recreation Trail.

Lake Frierson State Park

http://www.arkansasstateparks.com//lakefrierson

Atop the unique landform of rolling hills called Crowley's Ridge, this park on the shore of 335-acre Lake Frierson is a peaceful place to relax and enjoy the year-round fishing for bream, catfish, crappie, and bass. The park's natural beauty is enhanced each spring when the wild dogwoods throughout the park bloom.
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