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Admiral William Standley State Recreation Area

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=424

Admiral William Standley State Recreation Area is at an elevation of 1,700 feet in the Coastal Range. It is located near the headwaters of the south fork of the Eel River.

Ahjumawi Lava Springs State Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=464

Ahjumawi is a place of exceptional, even primeval, beauty. Brilliant aqua bays and tree studded islets only a few yards long dot the shoreline of Ja-She Creek, Crystal Springs, and Horr Pond. Over two thirds of the area is covered by recent (three to five thousand years) lava flows including vast areas of jagged black basalt.

Anderson Marsh State Historic Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=483

Anderson Marsh State Historic Park contains oak woodlands, grass-covered hills, and tule marsh. One of the largest groups of people in prehistoric California, the Southeastern Pomo, knew this land as home. Today, descendants of those people still live nearby.

Andrew Molera State Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=582

In the spectacular Big Sur area, this park is still relatively undeveloped and offers visitors great hiking and beachcombing.

Angel Island State Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=468

In the middle of San Francisco Bay sits Angel Island State Park, offering spectacular views of the San Francisco skyline, the Marin Headlands and Mount Tamalpais.

Annadel State Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=480

....through November of 2011, Channel Drive will be used to transport construction equipment and materials as needed to relocate approximately 2500 feet of City owned trunk sewer main that is currently located immediately adjacent to Oakmont Creek. The new trunk sewer main will be located away from the creek, north of, and roughly parallel to Channel Drive, east of the gated entry near the Annadel State Park trailer at 6201 Channel Drive. The new trunk sewer main will not be located on State Park property.

Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve State Natural

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=627

Each spring, the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve comes alive with the seasonal surprises of the Mojave Desert Grassland habitat. The duration and intensity of colors and scents vary from year to year. Although the wildflower season generally lasts from as early as mid-February through mid-May, the park is open year-round from sunrise to sunset. Fall is also a pleasant time to visit, as the days are normally warm with milder winds.

Antelope Valley Indian Museum State Historic

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=632

Antelope Valley Indian Museum State Historic Park is California's State Regional Indian Museum representing Great Basin Indian Cultures.The exhibits and interpretive emphasis are on American Indian groups (both aboriginal and contemporary) of the Southwest, Great Basin, and California culture regions, since Antelope Valley was a major prehistoric trade corridor linking all three of these culture regions. The museum contains the combined collections of founder Howard Arden Edwards and subsequent owner Grace Oliver. A number of the cultural materials on display are rare or one-of-a-kind objects. To view the entire museum collection, and access detailed interpretive information on American Indian cultures represented, please go to www.avim.parks.ca.gov.

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=638

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is the largest state park in California. Five hundred miles of dirt roads, 12 wilderness areas and many miles of hiking trails provide visitors with an unparalleled opportunity to experience the wonders of the California Desert. The park is named for Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza and the Spanish word borrego, or bighorn sheep. The park features washes, wildflowers, palm groves, cacti and sweeping vistas. Visitors may also have the chance to see roadrunners, golden eagles, kit foxes, mule deer and bighorn sheep as well as iguanas, chuckwallas and the red diamond rattlesnake. Listening devices for the hearing impaired are available in the visitor center.

Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=450

The serene, majestic beauty of this Grove is a living reminder of the magnificent primeval redwood forest that covered much of this area before logging operations began during the 19th century. Armstrong Redwoods preserves stately and magnificent Sequoia sempervirens, commonly known as the coast redwood. These trees stand together as a testament to the wonders of the natural world. The grove offers solace from the hustle and bustle of daily life, offering the onlooker great inspiration and a place for quiet reflection.

Arthur B. Ripley Desert Woodland State Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=634

Added to the State Park System in 1988, Ripley Desert Woodland is located just west of the Poppy Reserve on Lancaster Road at 210th Street West. Donated to the State by Arthur "Archie" Ripley, the park protects and preserves an impressive stand of native Joshuas and junipers which once grew in great abundance throughout the valley. Today, only remnant parcels of this majestic woodland community remain in the valley, the rest having been cleared for farming and housing.

Asilomar State Beach

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=566

Located on the Monterey Peninsula in the city of Pacific Grove, Asilomar offers beach and coast trail walks, a short boardwalk loop through the natural dune preserve and overnight room lodging and conference facilities. From its historic architecture to the forest, the dunes and coastline, State Park staff takes the lead in protecting and educating park visitors to Asilomar and monitors the delicate balance between preservation and public access.

Auburn State Recreation Area

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=502

In the heart of the gold country, the Auburn State Recreation Area (Auburn SRA) covers 40-miles of the North and Middle Forks of the American river. Once teeming with thousands of gold miners, the area is now a natural area offering a wide variety of recreation opportunities to over 900,000 visitors a year.

Austin Creek State Recreation Area

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=452

Austin Creek State Recreation Area is adjacent to Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve and is accessed through the same entrance. With open woodlands, rolling hills, and meadows, its topography offers a strong contrast to the dense, primeval redwood forest below. Here you will discover deep tree-lined ravines cooled by year round streams; grassy hillsides burnished golden by the heat of summer sun and turned emerald by plentiful winter rains; oak capped knolls that seem to float like islands on lakes of lowland fog; and rocky mountaintops that showcase an almost panoramic view. A paradise for the hiker and equestrian, Austin Creek rewards the explorer with twenty miles of trails and panoramic wilderness views, back-country camping, and Bullfrog Pond Campground- accessible by vehicle. The park's rugged topography, with elevations ranging from 150-1500 feet in elevation, offers a sense of isolation from the accustomed sights and sounds of civilization.

Azalea State Natural Reserve

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=420

A reserve for western azalea (Rhododendron occidentale). Each spring, a profusion of pink and white blossoms scents the air. There is a picnic area available. Plan to visit in April and May when azaleas are in bloom.

Bale Grist Mill State Historic Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=482

The park is the site of a water-powered grist mill that was built in 1846. It was once the center of social activity as Napa Valley settlers gathered to have their corn and wheat ground into meal or flour. The owner of the mill was Dr. Edward Turner Bale. He received the property in a land grant from the Mexican government and lived near the site until his death in 1849. The mill remained in use until the early 1900s.

Bean Hollow State Beach

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=527

The beach features fishing, picnicking and beachcombing. Visitors can explore tide pools with anemones, crab, sea urchins and other marine inhabitants. The beach also has a self-guided nature trail.

Benbow Lake State Recreation Area

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=426

To provide power for the new development in the valley , a concrete dam was constructed across the south fork of the Eel River in 1928. The dam not only provided power but also created Benbow Lake.

Benicia Capitol State Historic Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=475

Benicia Capitol State Historic Park is the site of California’s third seat of government (1853-54). It is the only pre-Sacramento capitol that survives.

Benicia State Recreation Area

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=476

Benicia State Recreation Area covers marsh, grassy hillsides and rocky beaches along the narrowest portion of the Carquinez Strait.

Bethany Reservoir State Recreation Area

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=562

Located in the northernmost part of the San Joaquin Valley, Bethany Reservoir State Recreation Area is a popular place for water-oriented recreation, especially fishing and windsurfing. It also features a bike trail (along the California Aqueduct Bikeway) - and many windmills. It is also the northern terminus of the California Aqueduct.

Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=460

Bidwell Mansion State Historic Park is a beautiful, three-story, 26 room Victorian House Museum that stands as a memorial to John and Annie Bidwell. John Bidwell was known throughout California and across the nation as an important pioneer, farmer, soldier, statesman, politician and philanthropist. Annie Ellicott Kennedy Bidwell, the daughter of a socially prominent, high ranking Washington official, was deeply religious, and committed to a number of moral and social causes. Annie was very active in the suffrage and prohibition movements.

Bidwell-Sacramento River State Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=463

The main activity to be enjoyed at Bidwell-Sacramento River State Park is bank or boat fishing for salmon, steelhead and shad. The next popular activity is "cruising down the river" on inner tubes, canoes, or kayaks.

Big Basin Redwoods State Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=540

The park is about 65 miles south of San Francisco. From Santa Cruz travel approx 25 miles northwest via Highways 9 and 236 to reach Park Headquarters. Park Headquarters is 9 miles north of the town of Boulder Creek on State Hwy 236. All roads into Big Basin are curvy. The Rancho Del Oso coastal unit of Big Basin is accessible on State Route 1, about 20 miles north of the city of Santa Cruz.

Bodie State Historic Park

http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=509

Bodie State Historic Park is a genuine California gold-mining ghost town. Visitors can walk down the deserted streets of a town that once had a population of nearly 10,000 people. The town is named for Waterman S. Body (William Bodey), who had discovered small amounts of gold in hills north of Mono Lake. In 1875, a mine cave-in revealed pay dirt, which led to purchase of the mine by the Standard Company in 1877. People flocked to Bodie and transformed it from a town of a few dozen to a boomtown.
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