Delaware

Links

Alapocas Run

http://www.destateparks.com/park/alapocas-run/index.asp

It's hard to imagine a lush getaway, situated in the heart of Wilmington, near transportation and major roadways. But, once you discover it, you will return to this park again and again.

Bellevue

http://www.destateparks.com/park/bellevue/index.asp

Bellevue Hall mansion commands a grand view of this historic estate, and its present form reflects alterations made by William du Pont, Jr. Mr. du Pont surrounded his home with the finest facilities: tennis courts, equestrian stables, gardens, and a picturesque pond, amid woodlands and fields overlooking the Delaware River. The park was acquired by the State of Delaware in 1976.

Brandywine Creek

http://www.destateparks.com/park/brandywine-creek/index.asp

This 933-acre park is divided by grey stone walls built of local stone in the late 1800's. At that time the property was a dairy farm owned by the du Pont family. This unique area became a state park in 1965, one of the first parks in the nation to be purchased with Land and Water Conservation Funds.

Cape Henlopen

http://www.destateparks.com/park/cape-henlopen/index.asp

Cape Henlopen's beaches attract thousands of visitors who enjoy ocean swimming and sunbathing. Two designated swimming beaches provide lifeguard patrols between Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day (schedule may vary due to staff availability). Umbrellas can be rented during the summer. The northern swimming area also features a modern bath house with showers, changing rooms, and a food concession. This swimming area also features Mobi-Mat equipment, consisting of three 30-foot mats allowing those in wheelchairs and power chairs to access the beach from the boardwalk.

Delaware Seashore

http://www.destateparks.com/park/delaware-seashore/index.asp

Water, water everywhere describes Delaware Seashore State Park. Bounded on the east by the mighty Atlantic Ocean, and on the west by Rehoboth Bay and Indian River Bay, the 2825-acre park is a beach-goer's delight.

Fenwick Island

http://www.destateparks.com/park/fenwick-island/index.asp

Situated between the popular resort towns of Bethany Beach to the north and Fenwick Island and Ocean City to the south, Fenwick Island State Park is a relaxing escape from the summer crowds. This three-mile stretch of barrier island is a playground of sand, surf, and sun along Delaware's Atlantic coast.

First State Heritage Park

http://www.destateparks.com/park/first-state-heritage/index.asp

The First State Heritage Park at Dover is Delaware's first urban "park without boundaries" linking historic and cultural sites in the city that has been the seat of state government since 1777. It is a partnership of state and city agencies under the leadership of Delaware State Parks.

Fort Delaware

http://www.destateparks.com/park/fort-delaware/index.asp

Fort Delaware, the Union fortress dating back to 1859, once housed Confederate prisoners of war. It was originally built to protect the ports of Wilmington and Philadelphia.

Fort DuPont

http://www.destateparks.com/park/fort-dupont/index.asp

While you are in the Delaware City area, take the time to visit nearby Fort DuPont State Park. Named for Rear Admiral Samuel Francis du Pont, the Fort was actively used as a military base from the Civil War through World War II. Following World War II, the Fort was turned over to the State of Delaware and has been used for various purposes, including the Governor Bacon Health Center. Portions of the land were dedicated as a State Park in 1992.

Fox Point

http://www.destateparks.com/park/fox-point/index.asp

Although each of the parks in the Delaware State Park system has its own unique features, Fox Point State Park deserves something more than "unique" in its description. Perhaps the best word is "extraordinary.

Holts Landing

http://www.destateparks.com/park/holts-landing/index.asp

Holts Landing is an undiscovered facet of the Diamond State's park system. The 203-acres area contains a variety of beautiful landscapes, from bay shore beach to grassy fields and hardwood forests. Historically, the shores of the inland bays were home to native Americans, who harvested seafood and hunted in the surrounding marshes and forests. After the European settlers arrived, agriculture developed slowly around the "little bays.

Killens Pond

http://www.destateparks.com/park/killens-pond/index.asp

Natural and recreational opportunities abound at Killens Pond State Park, centrally located in the heart of Kent County. The park's centerpiece is the 66-acre millpond which features boating and fishing. The all new Killens Pond Water Park offers resort entertainment in a serene, natural setting. Only about an 1 hour drive from either the northern or southern boundary, Killens Pond makes a perfect home base for exploring the First State. Open year-round, the park's campground and cozy cabins are popular retreats no matter what the season.

Lums Pond

http://www.destateparks.com/park/lums-pond/index.asp

Lums Pond State Park is built around the largest freshwater pond in Delaware. The park features excellent fishing, sports facilities, hiking trails and more on its 1790 acres on the north side of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. Lums Pond itself covers 200 acres, and although there is no swimming allowed, boat rentals and fishing provide water-bound recreation in the summer months. A boat launching ramp and two piers allow easy access to the water.

Trap Pond

http://www.destateparks.com/park/trap-pond/index.asp

Freshwater wetlands once covered a large portion of southwestern Sussex County. Trap Pond State Park retains a part of the swamp's original beauty and mystery, and features the northernmost natural stand of baldcypress trees in the United States. The pond was created in the late 1700s to power a sawmill during the harvest of large baldcypress from the area. The Federal Government later purchased the pond and surrounding farmland during the 1930s and the Civilian Conservation Corps began to develop the area for recreation. Trap Pond became one of Delaware's first state parks in 1951.

White Clay Creek

http://www.destateparks.com/park/white-clay-creek/index.asp

Come to White Clay Creek to escape the encroaching development of New Castle County. The park's lush greenery and sparkling streams offer a refreshing change of pace and countless opportunities for outdoor fun and relaxation.

Wilmington

http://www.destateparks.com/park/wilmington/index.asp

Find recreation, education, and sports and community events right in the heart of Wilmington. Connected by trails, these parks are the perfect place to relax, hike, picnic, or just enjoy the beauty of the Brandywine River.

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