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A.H. Stephens Historic Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/AHStephens

This pretty park west of Augusta is best known for its equestrian facilities, Confederate museum and lakeside group camp.  Horseback riders can explore 12 miles of trails and stay overnight in their own primitive campground.  Overnight guests can choose from lakeside cottages or a modern campground, while large groups can enjoy privacy in the park’s group camp or pioneer campground.

Amicalola Falls State Park and Lodge

http://www.gastateparks.org/AmicalolaFalls

Spectacular scenery and hiking trails make this one of Georgia’s most popular state parks. At 729 feet, Amicalola Falls is the tallest cascade in the Southeast.  Visitors have choices on how to best view the tumbling waters, ranging from an accessible pathway to a challenging trail with staircases.  Those who tackle the latter can join the park’s Canyon Climbers Club.  An 8.5-mile trail leads from the park to Springer Mountain, the southern end of the famous 2,175-mile Appalachian Trail. Numerous other trails provide shorter day hikes.

Black Rock Mountain State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/BlackRockMountain

Georgia’s highest state park encompasses some of the most outstanding scenery in Georgia’s Blue Ridge Mountains.  Roadside overlooks provide spectacular 80-mile vistas, and four hiking trails lead visitors past wildflowers, streams, small waterfalls and lush forests. Visitors enjoy the summit visitor center for its views, gift shop and picnic tables. 

Bobby Brown State Outdoor Recreation Area

http://www.gastateparks.org/BobbyBrown

This pretty Outdoor Recreation Area offers water sport enthusiasts easy access to Clarks Hill Lake, the second-largest man-made lake east of the Mississippi River.  The 71,100-acre reservoir is nestled on the Georgia-South Carolina border, north of Augusta.  A boat ramp is open year-round, and the self-reservation campground is open seasonally.  Park visitors can explore nearly two miles of wooded trails and take a self-guided land navigation/compass course. 

Chattahoochee Bend State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/ChattahoocheeBend

Georgia’s newest state park showcases a spectacular tract of wilderness in northwest Coweta County.  Located in a graceful bend of the Chattahoochee River, the park is a haven for paddlers, campers and anglers.  At 2,910 acres, Chattahoochee Bend is one of Georgia’s largest state parks, protecting seven miles of river frontage.  A boat ramp provides easy access to the water, while more than six miles of wooded trails are open for hiking and nature photography.  An observation platform provides nice views of the river and forest.

Chief Vann House Historic Site

http://www.gastateparks.org/ChiefVannHouse

During the 1790s, James Vann became a Cherokee Indian leader and wealthy businessman. He established the largest and most prosperous plantation in the Cherokee Nation, covering 1,000 acres of what is now Murray County. In 1804 he completed construction of a beautiful 2 ½-story brick home that was the most elegant in the Cherokee Nation. After Vann was murdered in 1809, his son Joseph inherited the mansion and plantation. Joseph was also a Cherokee leader and became even more wealthy than his father.

Cloudland Canyon State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/CloudlandCanyon

Located on the western edge of Lookout Mountain, this is one of the most scenic parks in the state, offering rugged geology and exceptional hiking. The park straddles a deep gorge cut into the mountain by Sitton Gulch Creek, and elevation differs from 800 to 1,980 feet.

Crooked River State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/CrookedRiver

Located on southern tip of Georgia’s Colonial Coast, this park is the perfect spot for enjoying the intracoastal waterway and maritime forest.  Campsites are surrounded by palmettos and Spanish moss-draped oaks, while cottages are set near the tidal river.  A boat ramp is popular with anglers who often take to the water before sunrise.  Just down the road is the ferry to famous Cumberland Island National Seashore known for secluded beaches and wild horses. 

Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site

http://www.gastateparks.org/DahlonegaGoldMuseum

Twenty years before the famed 1849 gold rush in California, thousands of prospectors flocked into the Cherokee Nation in north Georgia, marking the true beginning of our country's first gold rush. Their dramatic story is told inside the historic 1836 Lumpkin County Courthouse, the oldest courthouse in Georgia.

Elijah Clark State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/ElijahClark

This park is located on the western shore of 71,100-acre Clarks Hill Lake, one of the largest lakes in the Southeast.  With its boat ramps and accessible fishing pier, it is especially popular with anglers and boaters.  A sandy swimming beach welcomes visitors to cool off during Georgia summers.  Rental cottages are located on the lake’s edge, and the spacious campground is nestled into the forest.  Tent campers will enjoy extra privacy in the walk-in section.

Etowah Indian Mounds Historic Site

http://www.gastateparks.org/EtowahMounds

Home to several thousand Native Americans from 1000 A.D. to 1550 A.D., this 54-acre site protects six earthen mounds, a plaza, village site, borrow pits and defensive ditch. Etowah Mounds is the most intact Mississippian Culture site in the Southeast.  Artifacts in the museum show how natives of this political and religious center decorated themselves with shell beads, paint, complicated hairdos, feathers and copper ear ornaments. Hand-carved stone effigies weighing 125 pounds still bear some original pigments.  Objects made of wood, seashells and stone are also displayed.

F.D. Roosevelt State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/FDRoosevelt

At 9,049 acres, Georgia’s largest state park is a hiker’s and backpacker’s haven.  More than 40 miles of trails, including the popular 23-mile Pine Mountain Trail, wind through hardwood and pines, over creeks and past small waterfalls.  Many visitors are surprised to find rolling mountains 80 miles southeast of Atlanta.  Above King’s Gap is Dowdell’s Knob where President Franklin D. Roosevelt sometimes picnicked and pondered world affairs.  A life-size sculpture of the president now welcomes visitors to the overlook.

Florence Marina State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/FlorenceMarina

Sitting at the northern end of 45,000-acre Lake Walter F. George (also called Lake Eufaula) this quiet park offers the perfect getaway for those who love water sports. It is adjacent to a natural deep-water marina with an accessible fishing pier, boat slips and boat ramp.  Overnight guests can choose from a variety of accommodations, including fully equipped cottages, small efficiency units and a modern campground. 

Fort King George Historic Site

http://www.gastateparks.org/FortKingGeorge

This is the oldest English fort remaining on Georgia's coast. From 1721 until 1736, Fort King George was the southern outpost of the British Empire in North America. A cypress blockhouse, barracks and palisaded earthen fort were constructed in 1721 by scoutmen led by Colonel John “Tuscarora Jack” Barnwell. For the next seven years, His Majesty’s Independent Company garrisoned the fort. They endured incredible hardships from disease, threats of Spanish and Indian attacks, and the harsh, unfamiliar coastal environment. After the fort was abandoned, General James Oglethorpe brought Scottish Highlanders to the site in 1736. The settlement, called Darien, eventually became a foremost export center of lumber until 1925.

Fort McAllister Historic Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/FortMcAllister

Located south of Savannah on the banks of the Ogeechee River, this scenic park showcases the best-preserved earthwork fortification of the Confederacy. The earthworks were attacked seven times by Union ironclads but did not fall until 1864 -- ending Gen. William T. Sherman’s “March to the Sea.”  Visitors can explore the grounds with cannons, a furnace, bombproof, barracks, palisades and more, while a Civil War museum contains artifacts, a video and gift shop.

Fort Morris Historic Site

http://www.gastateparks.org/FortMorris

When the Continental Congress convened in 1776, the delegates recognized the importance of a fort to protect their growing seaport from the British. Soon afterwards, a low bluff on the Medway River at Sunbury was fortified and garrisoned by 200 patriots. When the British demanded the fort’s surrender on November 25, 1778, the defiant Col. John McIntosh replied, “Come and take it!” The British refused and withdrew back to Florida. Forty-five days later, they returned with a superior force, and on January 9, 1779, Fort Morris fell after a short but heavy bombardment.

Fort Mountain State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/FortMountain

A scenic drive on Hwy. 52 near the Cohutta Wilderness leads visitors to this mountain getaway.  Hikers, mountain bikers and horseback riders will find some of the most beautiful trails in Georgia, winding through hardwood forest and blueberry thickets, crossing streams and circling a pretty lake.  Hikers can also explore a stone fire tower built by the Civilian Conservation Corps and an ancient rock wall which stand on the highest point of the mountain.  The mysterious 855-foot-long wall is thought to have been built by early Indians as fortification against more hostile Indians or for ancient ceremonies. 

Fort Yargo State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/FortYargo

Located between Atlanta and Athens, this popular park features a 1792 log fort built by settlers for protection against Creek and Cherokee Indians. Today, visitors come to Fort Yargo for its wide variety of outdoor recreation and scenery. Mountain bikers and hikers can test their endurance on 18 miles of trails. A 260-acre lake offers a large swimming beach, fishing and boat ramps. The park’s wooded disc golf course is exceptionally challenging. 

General Coffee State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/GeneralCoffee

One of southern Georgia’s “best kept secrets,” this park is known for agricultural history shown at Heritage Farm, with log cabins, a corn crib, tobacco barn, cane mill and other exhibits. Children enjoy feeding the park's farm animals, which usually include goats, sheep, chickens, pigs and donkeys.  Overnight accommodations include camping, cottages and the Burnham House, an elegantly decorated 19th-century cabin perfect for romantic getaways.

George L. Smith State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/GeorgeLSmith

With natural beauty, lakeside camping and cozy cottages, this secluded park is the perfect south Georgia retreat. It is best known for the refurbished Parrish Mill and Pond, a combination gristmill, saw mill, covered bridge and dam built in 1880.  A group shelter near the bridge is popular for family reunions and parties.  Some campsites sit right on the water’s edge, while cottages with gas fireplaces and screened porches are nestled into the woods.

George T. Bagby State Park and Lodge

http://www.gastateparks.org/GeorgeTBagby

Located in southwest Georgia on the shores of Lake Walter F. George (also known as Lake Eufaula), this resort park features a 60-room lodge, conference center and cottages. The Pilot House Grill Restaurant provides a courtesy dock for boaters who want to enjoy meals in the park, and the conference center is an affordable setting for weddings, reunions, meetings and retreats.  When the park’s championship Meadow Links Golf Course opened, Golf Digest magazine ranked it the “6th best new affordable public course” in the country. 

Georgia Veterans State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/GeorgiaVeterans

Established as a memorial to U.S. veterans, this park features a museum with aircraft (including a Boeing B-29A), armored vehicles, uniforms, weapons, medals and other items from the Revolutionary War through the Gulf War. An18-hole golf course and pro shop, along with 8,700-acre Lake Blackshear and proximity to I-75, make this one of Georgia’s most popular state parks.

Gordonia-Alatamaha State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/GordoniaAlatamaha

This southeast Georgia park is a favorite for picnicking, family reunions and golf. Picnic tables and shelters surround a small lake where visitors can rent pedal boats and fishing boats during warmer months. Docks are available for anglers, and children will enjoy looking for beaver dams from the observation deck. Five rental cottages face the golf course, all with screened porches, fireplaces and televisions. Gordonia-Alatamaha’s unusual name comes from the rare Gordonia tree – a member of the bay family that once grew in the park – and the original spelling of the nearby Altamaha River.

Hamburg State Outdoor Recreation Area

http://www.gastateparks.org/Hamburg

With modern-day facilities amidst reminders of days gone by, Hamburg State Park offers a wonderful mix of history and outdoor recreation. A campground offers shaded sites along the edge of quiet Hamburg Lake fed by the Little Ogeechee River.  Open seasonally, this self-registration campground provides hot showers, water and electric hookups, and a dump station.

Hard Labor Creek State Park

http://www.gastateparks.org/HardLaborCreek

While this park may be best known for its golf course, it also offers a wide range of recreational opportunities in a beautiful wooded setting. A lakeside beach is popular with swimmers during summer months, and more than 24 miles of trails are available for hikers and horseback riders.  Horse owners even have their own private camping area near stalls. Other overnight guests can choose from fully equipped cottages or a modern campground.  With so many ways to relax, it is ironic that the park’s name is thought to come from slaves who tilled summer fields or American Indians who found the creek difficult to cross.
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