Idaho

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Bear Lake

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/bearlake.aspx

Bear Lake State Park is located in a high mountain valley in the extreme southeast corner of Idaho. At 5,900 feet elevation, the park offers a wide variety of both summer and winter recreation opportunities. Bear Lake itself is 20 miles long and 8 miles wide with half of the lake in Idaho and half in Utah. The lake is a water sports Mecca attracting boaters, water skiers, and beach lovers from all over the country.

Bruneau Dunes

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/bruneaudunesstatepark.aspx

The tallest sand dune rises 470 feet above small lakes in the high desert south of Mountain Home. The state park includes desert, dune, prairie, lake and marsh habitat with opportunities to observe nocturnal species. Activities include fishing, birdwatching, camping, hiking, swimming and viewing the stars at one of only two public observatories in Idaho. Feel free to climb but no vehicles are allowed on the dunes. A visitor center offers information on birds of prey, insects, fossils, wildlife and the sand dunes. A variety of gift items are available for purchase. Two cabins are available for rent. Also 82 serviced campsites with W/E and 31 standard sites. The Equestrian Area provides facilities for visitors to camp with their horses and there is a 9-mile riding trail around the park.

Castle Rocks

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/castlerocks.aspx

Castle Rocks, nestled in Big Cove, at the base of the 10,339-foot Cache Peak, offers diverse recreational opportunities in a magnificent setting. It is a place where solitude, natural beauty, and ranching heritage combine to enrich the visitor's experience. The park is located two miles northwest of the village of Almo in southern Cassia County, Idaho.

CDA Parkway

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/coeurdaleneparkway.aspx

Walkers, hikers and bikers love this linear park that follows the north shore of beautiful Lake Coeur d'Alene. The Coeur d' Alene Parkway lies along the north shore of Lake Coeur d'Alene, following Centennial Trail east from Coeur d'Alene to Higgens Point. At Higgens Point there is a boat-launch facility, a picnic area overlooking the lake, and docks. Over 1,000 feet of public shoreline parallels the path. Also available are an exercise court, roadside picnic tables, toilet facilities and benches for those who wish to stop and enjoy the lake view.

City Of Rocks

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/cityofrocks.aspx

On his way to California in 1849, emigrant James F. Wilkens described the dramatic geological area he encountered as "City of Rocks." The name remains, as well as hundreds of pioneer inscriptions, wagon ruts, and journal accounts, testifying to the nearly quarter-million people who traveled through here between 1843 and 1869. Visitors today will see nearly the same scene - granite spires and monoliths reaching 60 stories tall. Geologists estimate the oldest granite to exceed 2.5 billion years. Established in 1988 as a national reserve, City of Rocks encompasses 14,407 acres of land (about one quarter is privately owned) and is reneowned for its scenic, geologic, and historic significance. The City of Rocks area was an important landmark on the California Trail. City of Rocks is one of the finest granite-face climbing sites anywhere. Climbers find the younger granite of the Almo Pluton to be some of the best rock they've ever ascended. About 700 routes have been developed to date. City of Rocks also has ample access to hiking, mountain biking, and horseback riding. The winter months provide excellent opportunities for snowshoeing and skiing.

Dworshak

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/dworshak.aspx

Dworshak State Park is located among trees and meadows on the western shore of Dworshak Reservoir. The park is comprised of three units - Freeman Creek, Three Meadows Group Camp, and Big Eddy Lodge and Marina.

Eagle Island

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/eagleisland.aspx

Eagle Island is a 545-acre day-use park west of Boise that features a popular swimming beach, a grassy picnic area, a waterslide and more than five miles of trails for those looking for a place to ride horses, hike, walk your dog, or play disc golf.

Farragut

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/farragut.aspx

The Farragut State Park visit starts at the park Visitor Center located at the west entrance. Here one will find park maps, trail guides, campground registration, natural history, and park displays. Inside the Visitor Center is the Farragut gift shop where one can find a variety of unique souvenir items and snacks.

Harriman

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/harriman.aspx

Harriman State Park lies within an 16,000-acre wildlife refuge in the greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Moose, Elk, and Sandhill Cranes are common, as is North America's largest waterfowl, the Trumpeter Swan. Known as one of the best fly-fishing streams in the nation, the Henrys Fork meanders for eight miles through Harriman. Over 20 miles of trails are available for hiking, biking, horseback riding, and cross county skiing. Guided horseback tours are offered by a park vendor, Dry Ridge Outfitters, 208-558-RIDE (7433).

Hells Gate

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/hellsgate.aspx

Hells Gate State Park is the gateway to both Idaho's Lewis and Clark country and to Hells Canyon, the deepest river gorge in North America. Shady campsites along the Snake River make comfortable base-camps for exploration of the surrounding area. Jet boat excursions into Hells Canyon leave on a regular basis from the park's docks. The Nez Perce National Historic Park is only 30 minutes away. A wide choice of restaurants and shopping are just minutes away, in nearby Lewiston Idaho.

Henrys Lake

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/henryslake.aspx

Located just 15 miles west of Yellowstone National Park, this high mountain lake is the kind of place fishermen dream about. The state park, named after explorer Major Andrew Henry, opens the Thursday before Memorial Day and closes mid-October, weather permitting. Anglers fish for cutthroat, brook and rainbow-cutthroat hybrid trout. The park has a modern fish cleaning station near the boat ramp. Camping is at one of 44 sites and there are camping-cabins also available for rent. During winter, information on Henrys Lake can be obtained by calling Harriman State Park.

Heyburn

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/heyburn.aspx

Heyburn State Park is the oldest park in the Pacific Northwest. Created in 1908, it is comprised of approximately 5,500 acres of land and 2,300 acres of water. The park includes three lakes; Chatcolet, Benewah, and Hidden Lakes, with the shadowy St. Joe River meandering along the eastern boundary of the park.

Lake Cascade

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/lakecascade.aspx

Lake Cascade State Park provides diverse and exciting recreational opportunities throughout all four seasons.

Lake Walcott

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/lakewalcott.aspx

Lake Walcott State Park is located at the northwest end of the Bureau of Reclamation's Lake Walcott Project, a welcome refuge on the edge of Idaho's high desert. Water skiing, power boating, windsurfing, sailing and bird watching are only a few of the activities that will make your stay at Lake Walcott enjoyable. Camping areas with RV hookups are available. Picnickers and tenters enjoy the acres of grass beneath groves of stately eastern hardwoods. Nearby sites of interest include Minidoka Falls near the park, Rupert City Park, and the historic railroad community of Minidoka.

Land of Yankee Fork

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/yankeefork.aspx

The Land of the Yankee Fork State Park brings to life Idaho’s frontier mining history. This State Park is part of the larger Land of the Yankee Fork Historic Area located in scenic central Idaho. Managed by the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation, the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the Challis District of the Bureau of Land Management this historic area provides unique historical interpretation and many recreational opportunities. At the Yankee Fork Visitor Center near Challis there are museum exhibits, a gold panning station, audiovisual programs, and friendly personnel to provide information on local mining history and area attractions. Also of interest are the ghost towns of Bonanza, Custer and Bayhorse, the Yankee Fork Gold Dredge, the Custer Motorway and the Challis Bison Jump.

Lucky Peak

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/luckypeak.aspx

Discovery Park is a popular roadside park for picnics with three shelters that are reserveable, walking your pet or fishing in the Boise River.

Massacre Rocks

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/massacrerocks.aspx

Oregon Trail emigrants referred to the Massacre Rocks area as "Gate of Death" and "Devil's Gate", but modern day travelers use terms like beautiful, serene, and restful to describe the park. The park is rich in Oregon Trail, geological, and natural histories.

McCroskey

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/maryminervamccroskey.aspx

This 5300-acre ridgeline park is dedicated to pioneer women. McCroskey State Park's highlight is an 18-mile skyline drive through the park on unimproved roads provides spectacular views of the rolling Palouse country and access to 32 miles of multi-purpose trails. Facilities include a group day use shelter, primitive camping areas and picnic areas along the road. The road is not recommended for large RVs and may be too rough for your family car.

Old Mission

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/oldmission.aspx

The oldest standing building in all of Idaho is found here, in the Coeur d’Alene’s Old Mission State Park. The Mission of the Sacred Heart or Sacred Heart Mission was constructed between 1850 and 1853 by Catholic missionaries and members of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Sacred Heart Mission and the Coeur d’Alene’s Old Mission State Park provide an educational experience not found anywhere else, giving visitors an opportunity to examine the dynamics and complexities between Jesuit missionaries and the tribal people among whom they settled.

Ponderosa

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/ponderosa.aspx

Ponderosa State Park covers most of a 1,000-acre peninsula that juts into beautiful Payette Lake near McCall. The scenic overlook at Osprey Point offers a spectacular view of the lake. The park offers hiking and biking trails, guided walks with park naturalists and evening campfire programs. The North Beach Unit has a beach and picnic area. The topography ranges from arid sagebrush flats to dense forests. Wildlife that can be viewed at the park include Canada geese, osprey, bald eagles, wood ducks, mallards, songbirds, deer, moose, beaver, muskrats and even bear. Winter activities include Nordic skiing and snowshoeing on groomed trails.

Priest Lake

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/priestlake.aspx

Priest Lake State Park lies just 30 miles from the Canadian Border, nestled deep below the crest of the Selkirk Mountains. Surrounded by the natural beauty of Northern Idaho and mile-high mountains, Priest Lake State Park sits along the eastern shores of Priest Lake, a 19-mile long, over 300 foot deep lake.

Round Lake

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/roundlake.aspx

Round Lake State Park is situated in 142 acres of forest surrounding a 58-acre lake at an elevation of 2,122 feet. The lake is the product of glacial activity dating back to the Pleistocene Epoch.

Thousand Springs

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/thousandsprings.aspx

Thousand Springs State Park, with its five beautiful units and multiple areas, is a testament to why the area is called the Magic Valley. Visitors can view wagon ruts and bridge abutments at Kelton Trail, explore the magnificent Malad Gorge, access the riding arena at Billingsley Creek, get writing inspiration at Vardis Fisher, step back in time and tour historic structures at Ritter Island and Bonnieview, take in the scenery at Earl M. Hardy Box Canyon Springs Nature Preserve, view Niagara Springs, fish at Crystal Lake. Day use opportunities abound within the units of Thousand Springs State Park.

Three Island Crossing

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/threeislandcrossing.aspx

Three Island Crossing State Park is located on the Snake River at Glenns Ferry. It is home to The Oregon Trail History and Education Center where visitors can learn about pioneer emigrants and Native American history.

Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes

http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/trailofthecoeurdalenes.aspx

The Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes is a 73-mile paved trail spanning the Idaho panhandle between Mullan and Plummer. It was created through a unique partnership between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Union Pacific Railroad, the U. S. Government, and the State of Idaho. The trail begins in the historic Silver Valley, continues along the Coeur d'Alene River past scenic Lake Coeur d'Alene and through rolling farmlands to Plummer. Twenty developed trailheads provide entry points, and there are seventeen scenic waysides along the route for picnicking.
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