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Bear Creek Lake

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/bea.shtml

Less than an hour west of Richmond and nestled in the heart of Cumberland State Forest, Bear Creek Lake is the perfect getaway for the outdoor enthusiast. Activities center on the park's 40-acre lake complete with a boat launch, fishing pier, boat rentals and swimming beach. The park offers camping, cabins, a meeting facility, an archery range, lakeside picnicking, playgrounds, hiking and access to a 14-mile multi-use trail in the state forest.

BelleIsle

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/bel.shtml

Located in the rural Northern Neck of Virginia, Belle Isle is the first state park to be purchased with funds from the $95 million 1992 Parks and Recreational Facilities Bond Referendum. The 733-acre site is a window to the beautiful lower Rappahannock River in Lancaster County. Waterfront in the area has been developed extensively by private landowners with little public recreational access. This fact made the lower Rappahannock a priority for purchasing land for a new state park. The park has seven miles of frontage on the north shore of the Rappahannock, and it borders Deep and Mulberry creeks. It features diverse tidal and nontidal wetlands, lowland marshes, tidal coves and upland forests.

BreaksInterstate

http://www.breakspark.com/

Frontiersmen used to call a passage through the mountains a “break.” Such breaks were a rare thing indeed, offering the early settlers an opportunity to take their frontier lives to a new level. Layer upon layer of history welcomes today’s visitor, as does the still resplendent beauty of this unique 4600-acre park. Established in 1954 by an act of Congress initiated by the efforts of the two states it crosses, Virginia and Kentucky, it is now one of only two such interstate parks in the USA.

CaledonNaturalArea

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/cal.shtml

A designated National Natural Landmark, Caledon provides visitors the unique opportunity of viewing bald eagles in their natural habitat. Caledon and the surrounding areas are the summer home for one of the largest concentrations of bald eagles on the East Coast. As many as 60 eagles have been spotted on the bluffs overlooking the Potomac River in King George County. Preservation of the national bird's habitat is the primary focus of the natural area. Visitors can enjoy the beauty of Caledon by hiking and picnicking in a mature forest. Hiking trails in the eagle area are closed April through September to allow young birds undisturbed time to perfect their hunting and fishing skills. Limited tours of the eagle area are offered, however, mid-June through August by reservation only. Park guests can learn more about the natural history of Caledon and the American bald eagle by touring the visitor center.

ChippokesPlantation

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/chi.shtml

Chippokes Plantation State Park is one of the oldest working farms in the United States. Chippokes is a living historical exhibit located in a rural agricultural area along the James River in Surry County. In addition, the park has a wide variety of traditional park offerings, including a swimming complex, visitor center, picnic facilities, and hiking and biking trails. The plantation has kept its original boundaries since the 1600s and has a variety of cultivated gardens and native woodland. The formal gardens surrounding the Chippokes Mansion are accented by azaleas, crepe myrtle, boxwood and seasonal flowers. The plantation grounds are also home to the Chippokes Farm and Forestry Museum.

ClaytorLake

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/cla.shtml

Located on the 4,500-acre, 21-mile long Claytor Lake in the New River Valley of southwestern Virginia, Claytor Lake State Park offers a wide variety of activities for water and land enthusiasts. The park also has an excellent marina and meeting facility, Water's Edge.

Douthat

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/dou.shtml

The Outside Family Vacation Guide named Virginia’s Douthat State Park one of the nation's 10 best. The park, which straddles Bath and Alleghany counties, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Douthat is one of the original six Virginia State Parks that opened June 15, 1936. It's nestled in the Allegheny Mountains and features some of Virginia’s most outstanding scenery. In addition, a 50-acre lake offers swimming, boating and seasonal trout fishing.

FairyStone

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/fai.shtml

Fairy Stone State Park, the largest of Virginia's six original state parks, is home to its namesake "fairy stones." These rare mineral crosses and the park's scenic beauty, rich history and ample recreational opportunities make it a local and regional favorite. The 4,639 acres that make up the park were donated by Junius B. Fishburn, former owner of the Roanoke Times, in 1933. The Civilian Conservation Corps originally built the park, its lake and many structures still in use there.

FalseCape

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/fal.shtml

No vehicular access. Located in southern Virginia Beach, False Cape State Park is a mile-wide barrier spit between Back Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Access is through the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and is limited to hiking, bicycling or boating. The park features primitive camping and an extensive environmental education program in one of the last undisturbed coastal environments on the East Coast.

FirstLanding

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/fir.shtml

Originally built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s, First Landing State Park is located by the Chesapeake Bay. The park, which is Virginia’s most visited state park, is nestled in Virginia Beach. First Landing offers boating, swimming, nature and history programs, hiking, biking, picnicking, a boat launch, cabins and 20 miles of trails on 2,888 acres. It also has campsites with water and electric hook-ups and nearby access to restrooms and showers.

GraysonHighlands

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/gra.shtml

This mountain park is next to the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area in the Jefferson National Forest. Grayson Highlands State Park was originally named Mount Rogers State Park and was established in 1965. Pets are allowed in the park but not allowed inside public facilities including the bathhouses, visitor center and office.

HighBridgeTrail

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/hig.shtml

High Bridge Trail State Park is a multi-use trail ideally suited for hiking, bicycling and horseback riding. The trail, once a rail bed, is wide, level and generally flat. Its surface is finely crushed limestone. The trail's surface and dimensions make it easy for people of all ages and abilities to enjoy it. Its centerpiece is the majestic High Bridge, which is more than 2,400 feet long and 160 feet above the Appomattox River. The bridge was built in 1853 as part of the South Side Railroad.

HollidayLake

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/hol.shtml

Deep in the heart of Appomattox-Buckingham State Forest, Holliday Lake State Park is a paradise for the outdoor enthusiast. Fishing for largemouth bass, yellow perch, crappie and bluegill is a popular activity in the 150-acre lake within the park. The nearby state Department of Game and Inland Fisheries delayed-harvest trout stream allows anglers to fish for brown and rainbow trout. The park also features excellent trails open to hikers, bikers and equestrians. Swimming is a popular summer activity at the park's life-guarded beach where the "Critter Hole" play area is a favorite of young visitors. Park facilities include two campgrounds, a large shaded picnic area, two picnic shelters, two playgrounds, a boat ramp, a seasonal full-service concession stand, a camp store, and canoe, rowboat and paddle boat rentals. Interpretive and environmental education programs also are available for school and scout groups. This park is just minutes from the famous Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, the site of General Robert E. Lee's surrender to General Ulysses S. Grant in 1865.

HungryMother

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/hun.shtml

Hungry Mother State Park in southwestern Virginia is noted for its woodlands and lake. Easily accessible from Interstate 81, this park has folklore and history, swimming, camping, cabin rentals, boat rentals, hiking and the park system’s first conference center, Hemlock Haven.

JamesRiver

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/jam.shtml

The park opened to the public on June 20, 1999. It has more than 1,500 acres of rolling farm meadows and three miles of river frontage. Park facilities include cabins and lodges, primitive and water and electric campsites, primitive and water and electric horse campsites, and group camping. Thirteen primitive campsites are by the river and offer opportunities to canoe-in camp. There are 15 miles of trails for hiking, biking and horseback riding. There's also a wheelchair accessible trail around Green Hill Pond. Three fishing ponds and boating access to 12 miles of the James River make the park ideal for anglers. There are seven picnic areas in the park and six picnic shelters that offer beautiful views of the surrounding hills. There is limited wireless Verizon service in the cabin and day-use areas.

Kiptopeke

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/kip.shtml

Kiptopeke Birding Areas - Since 1963, Kiptopeke has been the site of bird population studies. Sponsored by the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory and licensed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, volunteers capture, examine, weigh, band and release resident and migratory birds each year from mid-August through November. In the raptor research area, hawks, kestrels, osprey and other birds of prey are observed and banded from September through November. Kiptopeke’s hawk observatory is among the top 15 nationwide.

LakeAnna

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/lak.shtml

The land in Lake Anna State Park used to be known as "Gold Hill" and contained the Goodwin Gold Mine. Gold was first discovered in 1829 with mining reaching its peak in the 1880s. In 1971 Lake Anna was created to serve as a water coolant for Dominion Power’s nuclear plant. In 1972 work began on the acquisition and development of a water-oriented state park. Lake Anna State Park opened in 1983.

Leesylvania

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/lee.shtml

Leesylvania opened in 1992. In 1978, noted philanthropist Daniel Ludwig donated the land to the state for a park. A national historical society, the Society of Lees of Virginia, was instrumental in securing the donation. Locally the area is known as Freestone Point, referring to the sandstone early settlers took from the property for building. Henry Lee III (Light Horse Harry) was born here at what was then Leesylvania Plantation in Colonial America. This Revolutionary War hero would later father the Confederate General Robert E. Lee of Civil War fame.

MasonNeck

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/mas.shtml

Mason Neck State Park is on a peninsula formed by Pohick Bay on the north, Belmont Bay on the south and the Potomac River on the east. Bald eagles roost in the park and fish waters surrounding the peninsula. The park also attracts several other migrating and non-migrating species of birds, including tundra swans, various species of ducks and great blue herons. One of the East Coast's largest heronries is here and in the adjacent wildlife refuge. The park boasts several hundred acres of hardwood forests consisting of oaks, holly, hickory and other species of trees. In addition, several wetland areas are also found in Mason Neck.

NaturalTunnel

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/nat.shtml

The state acquired the tunnel and 100 surrounding acres in 1967 from the Natural Tunnel Chasm and Caverns Corp. to establish Natural Tunnel State Park. Another 850 acres were later acquired, and the park opened in 1971. A modern meeting facility, the Cove Ridge Center, lies within the park. It came about thanks to a unique collaboration between the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation and the Cove Ridge Foundation.

NewRiverTrail

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/new.shtml

New River Trail State Park has been designated an official National Recreation Trail by the U. S. Department of the Interior. The park parallels 39 miles of the New River, which is one of the world's oldest rivers and among a handful of rivers flowing north

Occoneechee

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/occ.shtml

On the peaceful shore of beautiful John H. Kerr Reservoir, more commonly known as Buggs Island Lake, Occoneechee State Park is great for outdoor fun and relaxation. The park has more than 18 miles of trails that meander through the forest and along the lake’s shore. The trails enable hikers, bicyclists and horseback riders to take in the beauty of Virginia’s Piedmont. Nature lovers can enjoy the wildlife attracted to habitat enhancement plots along the park’s main road. The plots attract various birds, deer and woodland creatures.

Pocahontas

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/poc.shtml

Deep in the heart of a thick forest in Chesterfield County, Pocahontas State Park is only about 20 miles from downtown Richmond, Virginia's capital. The park on one of Virginia's more popular state parks. It offers a variety of outdoor activities, including biking, hiking, picnicking, swimming, camping and family-friendly nature programs. Swift Creek Lake and Beaver Lake give visitors a chance for excellent wildlife viewing and fishing. Use Pocahontas as your base camp to visit nearby Civil War Battlefields, amusement parks, Colonial Williamsburg, Jamestown and historic James River plantations.

Sailor'sCreekBattlefieldHistoric

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/sai.shtml

Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historical State Park is a great place to stop for lunch because it's midway between Petersburg and Appomattox Court House. There are charcoal grills and picnic tables at the Overton-Hillsman House and the visitor center grounds. No water is available. A pit-toilet is available during daylight hours.

ShenandoahRiverRaymondR."Andy"GuestJr.

http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state_parks/and.shtml

This park's hours of operation are between 8 a.m. and dusk. NOTE: This park is a Trash Free Facility - refuse must be removed by park visitor. A central refuse collection area is at the Cullers Overlook.
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