Wyoming

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Ames Monument Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=16

The monument serves as a memorial to the Ames brothers of Massachusetts. Oakes (1804 - 1873) and Oliver (1807-1877), whose wealth, influence, talent, and work were key factors in the construction of the first coast to coast railroad in North America. The contribution made by Oakes was especially significant even though in 1873 he was implicated in a scandal relative to financing the construction of the railroad [Credit Mobilier scandal].

Bear River State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=1

Bear River is a year-round park that offers nearly 300 acres that are ideal for picnicking, hiking, wildlife viewing, group activities, bicycling, skiing, rollerblading, remote control cars and many other activities. The park is home to a small head of captive bison and elk kept for public viewing. Three miles of foot trails are within park limits. They include 1.2 miles of paved trail and an arched footbridge that crosses the Bear River. Another 1.7 miles of packed gravel trails are on the of the west side of the river. The foot trails in the park also double as cross-country ski trails in the winter, weather prmitting. This park is for day-use only: no overnight camping is allowed.

Boysen State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=2

Boysen State Park is one of the larger parks in the State Park System. It is a lake-orientated park at the south end of the Owl Creek Mountains at the mouth of Wind River Canyon now part of the Wind River Canyon Scenic Byway. It offers a variety of water type recreation. Day and camping facilities are available. It features interesting geological formations. Several state record fish have been caught out of the reservoir.

Buffalo Bill State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=3

The majestic peaks of the Absaroka Mountains dominate the scenery at Buffalo Bill State Park. Two campsites, North Fork and North Shore, have a limited number of reservable sites. Learn more about the area at the Visitor Center with the interpretive exhibits, touch-screen computers, audio/visual presentation and a staff to help visitors.

Connor Battlefield Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=15

The site consists of 20 camping and picnic sites nestled in an oxbow of the Tongue River in the shade of large cottonwoods. There are two restrooms, a playground, and horseshoe pits. Each camping and picnic site has a grill and table and two sites are ADA accessible. Connor offers a quiet, relaxing campsite, away from the hustle of the road in the peaceful shade of a river bottom. Community facilities are within a few blocks, and yet a visitor would never know it. Camping sites operate on a first-come, first-served basis, without reservations. Camping is seasonal. The park closes to camping and vehicles on October 31.

Curt Gowdy State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=4

Curt Gowdy State Park has seven sections of richly varied landscape, flora and fauna decorate the foothills of the Laramie Mountains. The beautiful attractions within Curt Gowdy State Park are near the crossroads of two major interstates, I-80 and I-25. There are three reservoirs, Granite, Crystal and North Crow. Granite offers excellent rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fishing as well as space for water sports. Crystal, the smallest of the reservoirs, has shoreline fishing for brown trout, rainbow trout and kokanee salmon. Also, enjoy boating while at Crystal (15 horsepower limit). North Crow Reservoir is located 5 miles west of the Headquarter's Building. This is an unimproved fishing area. There are no picnic tables, water supply, comfort stations, and is day- use only—very natural. There are a limited number of reservable campsites at the Tumbleweed and Camp Russell campgrounds. Aspen Grove campground is next to a free public horse corral for those visitors who would like to camp with horses

Edness K. Wilkins State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=5

Edness K. Wilkins is a serene day-use park for families, nature lovers and those looking for solitude can enjoy. The huge old cottonwoods as they cast reflections on the historic North Platte River and lend shade to visitors. The North Platte River provides a natural habitat for a variety of wildlife, and for fishing, canoeing and rafting. Today, a visitor can utilize picnic tables, grills, group shelters, playgrounds and a launching ramp for canoes or rafts. A universally accessible fishing pier, the only one like it in the state, has become one of the finest amenities provided to visitors. An additional 2.8 miles of accessible hard-surfaced paths provide visitors with an opportunity view some of the finest wildlife in the area. Anglers can try their fishing luck in the North Platte River. Swimmers can take a refreshing dip at the park swimming area. Bird watching enthusiasts can wile away the hours searching for yellow warblers, cedar waxwings, downy woodpeckers, and dozens of others. One birder counted 40 different species of birds on a summer outing.

Fort Bridger Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=17

Established by Jim Bridger and Louis Vasquez in 1843 as an emigrant supply stop along the Oregon Trail. It was obtained by the Mormons in the early 1850s, and then became a military outpost in 1858. In 1933, the property was dedicated as a Wyoming Historical Landmark and Museum.

Fort Fetterman Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=19

Fort Fetterman, located north of Douglas, Wyoming, is situated on a plateau above the valleys of LaPrele Creek and the North Platte River. The fort was established as a military post on July 19, 1867, because of conditions that existed on the Northern Plains at the close of the Civil War. Civilization was advancing across the frontier along the line of the Union Pacific Railroad and the fort was needed as a major supply point for the army operating against the Indians. On July 31, 1867, the post was named Fort Fetterman in honor of Captain William J. Fetterman who was killed in a fight with Indians near Fort Phil Kearny, December 21, 1866. Major William McEnery Dye, with Companies A, C, H, and I, 4th Infantry, was assigned to build the post. In a letter to the Adjutant General, Major Dye described the post and surrounding country as ...situated on a plateau...above the valley of the Platte, being neither so low as to be seriously affected by the rains or snow; nor so high and unprotected as to suffer from the winter winds."

Fort Fred Steele Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=20

Fort Fred Steele was established on June 20, 1868 and occupied until August 7, 1886 by soldiers who were sent by the U.S. Government to guard against attack from indians. The construction of the Trans Continental Union Pacific Railroad across southern Wyoming 1867-1869, in turn, brought the cattlement, sheepherders, loggers, tie hacks, miners and merchants who changed the wasteland into Wyoming Territory.

Fort Phil Kearny Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=21

Named for a popular Union general killed in the Civil War, Fort Phil Kearny was established at the forks of the Big and Little Piney Creeks by Col. Henry B. Carrington of the 18th U.S. Infantry in July, 1866. The Mission of this fort and two other posts along the Bozeman Trail--Forts Reno and C.F. Smith--was three- fold: to protect travelers on the Trail; to prevent intertribal warfare between Native Americans in the area; and to draw attention of Indian forces opposed to Euro- American westward expansion away from the trans-continental railroad construction corridor to the south.

Glendo State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=6

Glendo State Park is one of southern Wyoming’s most popular boating parks. It offers visitors water-skiing, fishing and other water- based activities. Fishing is so good that Glendo has several fish records. Day-use and overnight facilities feature improved campsites, comfort stations, tables and grills. A commercial concession at the reservoir provides visitors with complete marina services, motel units and fishing equipment.

Granger Stage Station Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=22

This adobe-covered stone structure was one of dozens of Overland Trail stage stations built in the 1850s. The original station, Ham's Fork, was a dugout affair built around 1850. It was replaced by the stone structure in 1856 and renamed South Bend Station. Horace Greeley and Mark Twain were just two of the thousands of passengers who passed through. Later, the Pony Express used the station as a stopover in 1861-1862. When Union Pacific Railroad construction arrived in 1868, the old stage station was overrun with workers who renamed the site Granger.

Guernsey State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=7

Guernsey State Park provides seven campgrounds. Five are around the lake. All campgrounds include comfort stations, picnic tables, fire grills and drinking water. We also have a trailer dump station located at the south entrance to Guernsey State Park. This park provides the finest examples of Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) work in the Rocky Mountain area. Built by the CCC, the Guernsey Museum, the Castle and Brimmer Point are available to explore. The museum is perched on a high cliff, overlooking the water. The building itself is made of hand hewn timbers and hand forged iron. The roof is framed with the timbers and covered with split cedar shakes, and the floors were formed by pieces of smooth flagstone. The Castle, with its giant fireplace and winding steps, leads to an observation area for a spectacular view of the park.

Hawk Springs State Recreation Area

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=8

Hawk Springs reservoir boasts a blue heron rookery, including birds such as the blue-winged and green-winged teal, gadwall, pintail, wood duck, and great horned owl. Fishermen have long known that fishing is good at Hawk Springs. Game fish include walleye, largemouth bass and channel catfish. Winter ice fishing is also good at the park. There are 24 camping units, comfort stations, and accommodations for trailers. A boat ramp and parking area are available

Historic Governors' Mansion

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=23

During the early days of Wyoming’s statehood, Cheyenne’s affluent cattle barons built a series of mansions as a testament to their wealth and success; houses that might be referred to as “trophy homes,” today. In 1904, 14 years after achieving statehood in 1890, Wyoming built its first governor’s mansion, a modest house compared to the pretentious dwellings built in other parts of downtown Cheyenne. The Governor’s mansion was anything but extravagant, and is located just five blocks from the State Capitol in what was, at the time, a middle class neighborhood

Hot Springs State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=9

Over colorful terraces along the Big Horn River at Thermopolis flows water from mineral hot springs. More than 8,000 gallons flow over the terrace every 24 hours at a constant temperature of 135 degrees Fahrenheit. The park has a free bath house where the water is maintained at 104 degrees for theraputic bathing. Hot Springs has 6.2 miles of universally accessible trails and hiking trails. It is a full-service park with comfort stations, a Volksmarch trail, fishing, and a couple of boat docks. One of the reservable group picnic shelters is located here. Hot Springs is a day-use park.

Independence Rock Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=24

Independence Rock stands 6,028 feet (1,808.3m) above sea level. The tallest point of the rock is 136 feet (40.8m) above the surrounding terrain. If one were to walk around the base of this rock, the distance covered would be more than a mile, or 5,900 feet (1.8km). The mass of Independence Rock is equal to an area of 24.81 acres (9.924 ha). Windblown sand and silt have grooved the rock and polished it to a high gloss in a process called "windfaceting." It is because of this smoother surface that the pioneers were able to easily carve their names into the rock. It was the names carved in stone here that caused Father Peter J. DeSmet to appropriately name this place "The Register of the Desert" in 1840. Register Cliff and Names Hill also contain names left by the pioneers. There is no camping at this site.

Keyhole State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=10

Keyhole is a mecca for both resident and migrating birds of all species. Visitors also have the opportunity to enjoy a variety of other wildlife, including mule deer, pronghorn antelope and wild turkeys. There is a marina located on the headquarters side of the lake and operated by a concessionaire. The concessionaire has pop, alcohol, groceries, bait, tackle, fishing licenses and 10 electric campsites that he reserves. There is a public boat ramp at the marina

Medicine Lodge Archaeological Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=25

The Medicine Lodge site has long been known for its Indian petroglyphs and pictographs. They are directly associated with important human habitation sites for thousands of years. Within a 12-mile radius of Medicine Lodge, five distinct vegetation zones can be found. These range from the desert basin to the big mountain meadows. A variety of Wyoming's animals are here at the site. In addition to porcupines, prairie dogs, bobcats and mountain lions, there are many others to see. There is excellent fishing for brook and brown trout. Don't forget to bring your binoculars, as there are over 100 species of birds that call Medicine Lodge home.

Names Hill Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=26

This site, on the cliffs rising above the Green River, is one of three locations along the Oregon Trail where emigrants registered their presence. Here they camped and carved their names into the soft limestone. The earlist dates back to 1822 (making it the oldest pioneer inscription in Wyoming), but the most famous is that of mountain man Jim Bridger, who despite reportedly being unable to read or write, left his mark here in 1844. The Indians using pictographs, as well as the white man left his mark on the rock.

Oregon Trail Ruts

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=27

The Oregon Trail was one of the primary routes used by emigrants heading westward across the American continent in the 1840s. Although many remnants of the trail can be seen in Wyoming, the Oregon Trail tracks here are notable because they were cut into solid rock. A short trail leads uphill to four-foot deep gouges cut by the wheels of thousands of wagons. This site was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1975.

Piedmont Charcoal Kilns Historic Site

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=29

Built by Moses Byrne in 1869 to supply charcoal for the iron smelting industry in Utah, these conical limestone kilns measure 30 feet across and 30 feet high. Only three of the original 40 kilns remain. It was estimated that during 1873, the kilns could produce 100,000 bushels of charcoal. Most of the charcoal was sent to Utah on the UP railroad. Wood burned in the kilns came from the nearby Uinta Mountains. The ghost of Piedmont is nearby, as is the Byrne family cemeter

Seminoe State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=11

Seminoe State Park is nestled up against the base of the Seminoe Mountains. One of Wyoming’s treasures is located 35 miles north of Sinclair, Wyoming. Seminoe Reservoir offers the full range of water-based activities and is known for both trout and walleye fishing. Day-use and overnight facilities feature improved sites, comfort stations, tables and grills. Seminoe has four campgrounds available.

Sinks Canyon State Park

http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/Site/SiteInfo.aspx?siteID=12

Sinks Canyon State Park features a geologic phenomenon in which the Popo Agie River vanishes into a large cavern (the Sinks) but reappears in a trout- filled pool, the Rise, about half a mile down the canyon. These trout live a leisurely life, with no fishing allowed. A visitor center features wildlife and recreation exhibits, viewing sites and interpretive signs about wildlife and habitat requirements. The park contains hiking trails and offers camping, picnicking, rock climbing and fishing. Sinks Canyon is home to a wide variety of wildlife, birds and plants. Visitors might see porcupines, black bears, red squirrels, bighorn sheep, mule deer, moose or golden eagles.
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